Struggles with Imagined Gods and other poems

$ 16

Author

Mustansir Dalvi

Imprint

Poetrywala

Publication Year

2019

Language

English

Edition

2

Binding

Hardback

Pages

122

Translated by

Mustansir Dalvi

Original Author

Hemant Divate

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ISBN-13 : 9789382749585
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About the book

“Struggles with Imagined Gods brings the urban phantasmagoria that one has come
to associate with Hemant Divate’s poetry into the English language. This is a
poetic hyper-reality in which you are assailed by an avalanche of fast-moving,
colliding images of a culture dizzy on retail therapy, drunk on eternally
deferred promise. This is an indictment of a culture caught in an awkward
moment of history. In this climate of insatiable consumerist greed, the old gods
are irrelevant. The new gods are those that understand the lingo of seduction
and perpetual discontent.
Significantly, Struggles with Imagined Gods stands testimony to what good
translation can do to animate poetry. Far too often, the most linguistically
capable prose translator turns embarrassingly clunky when it comes to verse.
The translator’s understanding of poetic form is as vital as competence in the
target language—a fact, sadly, often overlooked. Thankfully, in Mustansir
Dalvi’s capable hands, Divate’s poems turn into a series of tonally distinct
explosions on the tongue, in which it is possible to discern the astringent from
the toxic, the salty from the acidic.”
— Arundhathi Subramaniam, The Book Review India
“In Struggles, the poet’s imagined god “searches for humanity/ in this vast
dung-heap of rags.” Lost faith, lost childhood, lost language, mourned, but
never surrendered to saccharine nostalgia. Read this book and be disturbed.
You may dislike the full-frontal assault in its pages, but you cannot fail to be
affected by the “jingle of life/ that slowly scrapes across the surface of dreams.’’
It is in Mustansir Dalvi’s translation that the charge of the original Marathi
crackles into an electricity that powers the lines in English. There is great
confidence here, the confidence of a poet with access to multiple spoken
fluencies, solidly grounded in the language that he writes in. This book
reaffirms my belief that poets make the best translators of poetry, and it is a
delight to see that both Divate and Dalvi get equal weightage on the cover,
rightly (and all-too rarely) claiming co-authorship of the text.”
— Sampurna Chattarji, Woodsmoke

About the author

Mustansir Dalvi was born in Bombay. He teaches architecture in Mumbai. His poems are included in the anthologies: These My Words: The Penguin Book of Indian Poetry (Eunice de Souza and Melanie Silgardo, editors); Mind Mutations (Sirrus Poe, editor); The Bigbridge Online Anthology of Contemporary Indian Poetry (Menka Shivdasani, editor); The Dance of the Peacock: An Anthology of English Poetry from India (Vivekanand Jha, editor); To Catch a Poem: An Anthology of Poetry for Young People (Jane Bhandari and Anju Makhija, editors); and The Enchanting Verses Literary Review (online, Abhay K, editor). Mustansir Dalvi’s 2012 English translation of Muhammad Iqbal’s influential Shikwa and Jawaab-e-Shikwa from the Urdu as Taking Issue and Allah’s Answer (Penguin Classics) has been described as ‘insolent and heretical’ and makes Iqbal’s verse accessible to the modern reader. This book was awarded Runner Up for Best Translation at the Muse India National Literary Award in 2012. His translations of the Sufi mystic poet Rahim are published in the anthology Eating God: a Book of Bhakti Poetry (Arundhati Subramanium, editor). His most recent book is struggles with imagined gods – selected translations of the poems of Hemant Divate from the Marathi, published by Poetrywala in 2014. Brouhahas of Cocks is his first book of poems in English published by Poetrywala in 2013. Mustansir Dalvi’s poems have been translated into French, Croatian and Marathi.

About the author

Mustansir Dalvi was born in Bombay. He teaches architecture in Mumbai. His poems are included in the anthologies: These My Words: The Penguin Book of Indian Poetry (Eunice de Souza and Melanie Silgardo, editors); Mind Mutations (Sirrus Poe, editor); The Bigbridge Online Anthology of Contemporary Indian Poetry (Menka Shivdasani, editor); The Dance of the Peacock: An Anthology of English Poetry from India (Vivekanand Jha, editor); To Catch a Poem: An Anthology of Poetry for Young People (Jane Bhandari and Anju Makhija, editors); and The Enchanting Verses Literary Review (online, Abhay K, editor). Mustansir Dalvi’s 2012 English translation of Muhammad Iqbal’s influential Shikwa and Jawaab-e-Shikwa from the Urdu as Taking Issue and Allah’s Answer (Penguin Classics) has been described as ‘insolent and heretical’ and makes Iqbal’s verse accessible to the modern reader. This book was awarded Runner Up for Best Translation at the Muse India National Literary Award in 2012. His translations of the Sufi mystic poet Rahim are published in the anthology Eating God: a Book of Bhakti Poetry (Arundhati Subramanium, editor). His most recent book is struggles with imagined gods – selected translations of the poems of Hemant Divate from the Marathi, published by Poetrywala in 2014. Brouhahas of Cocks is his first book of poems in English published by Poetrywala in 2013. Mustansir Dalvi’s poems have been translated into French, Croatian and Marathi.

More from the Author

  • Brouhahas Of Cocks

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    About the author

    Mustansir Dalvi was born in Bombay. He teaches architecture in Mumbai. His poems are included in the anthologies: These My Words: The Penguin Book of Indian Poetry (Eunice de Souza and Melanie Silgardo, editors); Mind Mutations (Sirrus Poe, editor); The Bigbridge Online Anthology of Contemporary Indian Poetry (Menka Shivdasani, editor); The Dance of the Peacock: An Anthology of English Poetry from India (Vivekanand Jha, editor); To Catch a Poem: An Anthology of Poetry for Young People (Jane Bhandari and Anju Makhija, editors); and The Enchanting Verses Literary Review (online, Abhay K, editor). Mustansir Dalvi?s 2012 English translation of Muhammad Iqbal's influential Shikwa and Jawaab-e-Shikwa from the Urdu as Taking Issue and Allah's Answer (Penguin Classics) has been described as 'insolent and heretical' and makes Iqbal's verse accessible to the modern reader. This book was awarded Runner Up for Best Translation at the Muse India National Literary Award in 2012. His translations of the Sufi mystic poet Rahim are published in the anthology Eating God: a Book of Bhakti Poetry (Arundhati Subramanium, editor). His most recent book is struggles with imagined gods – selected translations of the poems of Hemant Divate from the Marathi, published by Poetrywala in 2014. Brouhahas of Cocks is his first book of poems in English published by Poetrywala in 2013. Mustansir Dalvi's poems have been translated into French, Croatian and Marathi.
  • Selected Poems (1990-2015)

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    About the author

    17 September 1938 10 December 2009 was one of the foremost Indian poet writers and critics to emerge in the post-Independence India. Apart from being a very important bilingual writer, writing in Marathi and English, he was also a painter and filmmaker. He was one of the earliest and the most important influences behind the famous little magazine movement of the sixties in Marathi. He started Shabda with Arun Kolatkar and Ramesh Samarth His Ekun Kavita or Collected Poems were published in the nineteen nineties in three volumes. As Is, Where Is selected English poems 1964-2007 and Shesha English translations of selected Marathi poems both published by Poetrywala are among his last books published in 2007. He has also edited An Anthology of Marathi Poetry 19451965. He is also an accomplished translator and has prolifically translated prose and poetry. His most famous translation is of the celebrated 17th century Marathi bhakti poet Tukaram published as Says Tuka. He has also translated Anubhavamrut by the twelfth century bhakti poet Dyaneshwar.

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