Showing 21–40 of 100 results

  • Equator

    About the Book

    Reading Adriana Lisboa’s poems one becomes aware that in the clear light of their precise articulations something secret is taking place. That “something / taking place in secret” can be as anguished as the poems are calm; as wild as the poems are poised. She dares ask any question and – even more courageously – dares answer (or accept that there is none). Poems that are tethered to terra firma can cut loose without warning; knowing can ambush you from anywhere. There are no dirty tricks in her work, no showy gestures. Instead, there is the animating intelligence of life lived acutely, on and through words, this impossible sustenance that poets seek, and only rarely – as in Lisboa’s case – find. In her able translator Alison Entrekin’s hands, Adriana Lisboa’s poetry offers an exhilarating oxygen, “freeing in the word / what the word seals in”.

    Sampurna Chattarji, poetry editor of The Indian Quarterly

    $12
  • The Painter of Evenings

    About the Book

    Your poems are exceptional… My admiration grows for your poems – Jayanta Mahapatra.

    Kottoor is a poet who has discovered his own voice distinct from that of his ancestors or his compeers. ? Dr Ayyappa Paniker

    I earnestly believe that you are one of the most committed and ardent lovers of poetry. At my age (92), I would like to say—God bless you! With deep affection and admiration. – Shiv K Kumar

    Gopikrishnan Kottoor is one of the most exciting voices of the 90?s.- Chandrabhaga

    Thoroughly localized, yet universal. ? The Quest

    $20
  • River Wedding

    About the Book

    The hundred pages of this collection give scope enough to show the generosity of Amlanjyoti Goswami’s perception of the world. This is both intimate and ambitious, paying attention to the gentle nuances of family life without losing sight of the disturbing ways that history unfolds. Moments of revelatory strangeness are often entered through a child’s viewpoint – ‘sunlight talks to Zenzi…’ – but the effect never sentimental. The whole collection could be dedicated, in the delicate wording of a poem simply titled Lunch: ‘To life, more life. // The kind that,like a child, / takes in a morsel, when nobody’s looking.’ The deeper messages speak quietly, but all the more convincingly for that, and the points of arrival are not grand visions but ‘a fine ordinariness’. What renders this quality fine is Goswami’s sure and economical way with language – ‘we wear the dusk of sorry news’, or the blind flautist’s sensation of ‘the grain in the wood, the press and leave / of my fingers’. There is no postcolonial uncertainty in this marrying of Indian perspectives and the English language, whose literary heritage is graciously acknowledged, with nods to Soyinka and Achebe, to Walcott and even (with a healthily wry smile) to Matthew Arnold when he turns up in a second-hand bookstall in Chandni Chowk. Rather, there is a generous welcome to the world – with the freshness of an outsider’s view sometimes, but always with a sense of hospitality. -Philip Gross

    $16
  • Tips for Living in an Expanding Universe

    About the Book

    E. V. Ramakrishnan’s unique voice has reached another level of intensity in this new book of poems. He does not hark back to lost utopias or invoke dystopias. His poetry rips apart language to reach down to the palpable truth of experience. It aims at nothing short of the impossible: to hold together the ever expanding universe in an epiphany of the immediate.
    -H.S. Shivaprakash

    E. V. Ramakrishnan?s poems spin across metaphor and statement with fluid ease, often veering at the edge of axiom. There is an ability to combine elegy and irony, image and indictment, to blur the distinction between the mundane and the make-believe while never losing the sharp knife-blade of moral concern.
    -Arundhathi Subramaniam

    $12
  • The Unmistakable Presence of Absent Humans

    About the Books

    In a world of loss and absences, K. Srilata’s concerns go beyond the personal into larger issues of disappearing languages and people in conflict-ridden zones. Her sensitive eye for detail, the unexpected images and her use of language that can be both sharp and delicate, make these poems memorable. – Menka Shivdasani, Indian poet

    K Srilata, in writing this important collection, has given voice to all who struggle to find meaning, who wonder endlessly what that other reality might be – the one that lies just beyond our reach, just beyond the picture frame. Her writing invites us to see the unanswered questions as doorways back into our lives. I love Srilata’s book, her light touch, her true poetic-voice, and her ability to catch a poem on the wing and transmit it to her willing and excited reader. – Murray, Poet and editor of Poethead

    $16
  • A Yaksha in America

    About the Book

    Hebrew poet, translator and Editor-in-Chief, Helicon series of poetry

    The strength of Thachom Poyil Rajeevan’s poetry is rooted in the authentic evocation of the South Indian landscape of Kerala, especially his ability to do so with acute detail and clarity. We can smell, feel, and participate fully in the world he paints with his words. The inherent overlaying of the Malayalam and English tongues adds a subtle, but an important linguistic texture to his poetry. A welcome addition to contemporary English poetry in India.
    -Sudeep Sen
    Poetry Magazine

    $16
  • NOT ONLY THE OCEANS

    About the Book

    Not Only The Oceans carries twenty five poems, including along sequence composed by K. Satchidanandan during 2015-2017. The first six poems were written in Shimla where he spent an year as an invited National Fellow at the Indian Institute of Advanced Studies and carry the stamp of those hills with their touch of mystery as also the deep meditative experience of solitude the poet had while being there. The collection also carries a sequence of poems on Spain that he visited in 2015 as a poet invited to read in many cities including Madrid and take part in a workshop where his poems were translated into Spanish. The rest of the poems reflect his abiding concerns: love, death, war, violence and human dignity constantly violated by the inhuman State as well as the civil society with its outdated norms and values.

    $12
  • Collected Poems

    About the Book

    ” … a poet who has been a quietly enduring presence in the country’s literary scene for five decades … ” “It was my first realization that a gaze unclouded by sentiment could evoke something truer than sympathy. That an unspoken poignancy could lie in the act of not averting one’s gaze. That poetry could lie in a simple unblinking intensity of attention.”

    $16
  • Bimb

    About the author

    Sanjeev Khandekar (1958) is a poet and a visual artist. Kavita (Granthali, 1990) a collection of his early poetry and Search Engine (Granthali, 2004). These collections have been followed by three volumes of poetry – All that I Wanna Do (Abhidha Nantar, 2005), Mutatis Mutandis (2006) & (2014) and Two Poems (2006). Khandekar?s two books, ‘1,2,3… Happy Galaxy’ and collection of present poetry ‘Smiles’ (2007) are published by Abhida Nantar in 2007. In 1982, he edited Sankalp: A collection of essays by social activists in Maharashtra .It was awarded the Marathi Sahitya Parishad award. His second book, the novel Ashant Parva (Season of Unrest, 1992), concerns itself with the construction of a politically sensitive self in post-industrial India. Khandekar is based in Mumbai.
    $10
  • Grab your heart & follow me

    About the Book

    “In my wonderland, there are only beginnings, ‘there is no end’. Plunge into this book of?poems by Claus Ankersen where cat-gods rule, babies are born with stargates for eyes, kisses are catalogued and the 12th pen writes of celebratory sins. Expand the eternity of now. Be nomad, tiger, ‘soulhuntress.’ Head-dive into the mysteries of the world. Dance

    $4
  • Frazil

    About the Book

    Menka Shivdasani’s poetry is both original and strikingly unusual, not just her tangential way of putting things across, but also how thought process and imagination run away with the poem, and make it exciting. An experience is translated into another experience and then gets mixed with fancy in a juice blender. Chopping lettuce, she’ll be assailed by visions—burning bride,  politician, a ‘wounded Hiroshima’, and finally a finger-chopping Nazi. A poem about separation will end with her handling ‘alien porcelain’ at a tea party. For over three decades the excitement she brings to her fine poetry has never deserted her.

    $16
  • Elsewhere Where Else

    About the Book

    Sampurna Chattarji and Eurig Salisbury are two of the ten poets from India and Wales who took part in a project organized by Literature Across Frontiers and partners to mark the 70th anniversary of independent India. The poets collaborated to create new work and translate each other into their respective languages during a series of residencies in both countries, alternating between the hustle and bustle of Indian metropolises and the peace and quiet of welsh towns and rural locations. The project addressed, in a myriad ways, the theme of ?independence?. In artistic practice, independence means freedom to think, act and create beyond the confines of convention and economic necessity. But successful independence-of communities and individuals alike-also involves co-independence, collaboration and understanding across divides and differences. At a time of global change which sees increasing friction between identities, we hope this project has helped to open up a unique dialogue and formulate new narratives and ideas which both uncover and move beyond histories.

    $20