Showing 61–80 of 100 results

  • Three Stories – Jibanananda Das

    About the Book

    Reading Jibanananda Das’s stories is like entering straight into the middle-class Bengali mind with its desire, ambition, morbidity and despair. Through the narratives around three men whose melancholy defines the structure of these three stories, the writer re-examines the concepts of success and failure, desire and fulfillment, love and weariness, ennui and death. While the insights are those of a poet, these stories marked by Jibanananda’s deep involvement with Bengali landscape, cuisine and culture, transcend his lyrical impulse to become proper, if technically innovative, short stories with the touch of a master of the genre. Chandak Chattarji’s English versions have been able to capture the provincial setting and style of the original narratives keeping intact their nuanced psychological implications and larger insights into the human condition.’ – K. Satchidanandan ‘It has been a privilege to discover Das the writer of fiction through Chandak Chattarji’s elegant and sensitive translation of three of the master’s short stories, ‘Chhaya Nat’ (‘Shadow Play’), ‘Gram o Shohorer Galpo’ (‘Tale of City and Village’), and ‘Bilash’ (which retains its original title here).’ – Ranjit Hoskote

    $10
  • Gaibanyavaanacha

    About the Book

    Ajit Abhang is a promising young voice writing in Marathi. His poems are strong and hard-hitting and true to his circumstances; with no pretences. This is his first book of poems published by PoetryPrimero.

    $2
  • My Heart is an Unruly Girl

    About the Book

    Bold and sensuous, Mandakranta Sen’s poems document the truths of body and desire. Holding nothing back, they spill over the pages and force us to take notice. My heart is an Unruly girl is a worthy addition to feminist poems of love and desire. The rawness of the original Bengali translates beautifully and seamlessly into English. “She who writes poetry in the middle of the night/ With her hair undone – is a witch”, Mandakranta writes. One tends to agree. There is, certainly, an element of witchcraft in these poems, which cast a spell on the readers.

    $3
  • Learn from the Almond Leaf

    About the Book

    In these her late poems, the volcano that is Eunice de Souza is still erupting. As in her early work too, what she here ‘upchucks’ is lava, molten lines that burn and glow and leave a permanent mark. The tone, as before, is casual, bantering, close to the spoken idiom that is uniquely hers. When terrible things happen the tone changes, quickens, then relaxes again. Life is bemusing, ludicrous; death even more so. In the work of no other poet I can think of do you find such brevity and grandeur, swiftness of utterance and the unbearable weight of grief, unbearable because de Souza is so dry-eyed. ‘The crone’s still capable/of spite’ she writes in one poem, the old necklace-of-skulls self-irony intact, except that in her case ‘spite’ also means ‘wisdom’. It is easy to forget that the crone is deeply moral as well, and like any moral being she too feels that she’s lived ‘In the wrong season.’ There is plenty in these spare but unsparing poems to remind us of the classical virtues we associate with Bhartrhari, for instance, or a Latin epigrammatist like Martial. These are poems to live by. In time, they will come to be seen as classics of our literature, as many of her earlier poems already are. Arvind Krishna Mehrotra

    $10
  • 40 under 40

    About the Book

    “The Indian poetry scene has always been considered to be lively, but no better evidence of this fact exists than 40/40. Here we have forty contemporary Indian poets under forty years old, and what we encounter is extraordinarily timely and compelling, providing us the trace of a newly emergent lyric consciousness, simultaneously local and cosmopolitan. Here we have Akhil Katyal reminiscing about being ten years old and growing up in the shadow of the AIDS epidemic, “battling the stars of a virus”; we have Chandramohan S’ witty “Plus-Size Poem” that “does not opt for offshore liposuction”; and we have the speaker of Ishita Basu Mallik’s sonnenizio about going commando under her jeans and turning her beloved into ” an electric remnant bombarding” her “bones with wavelengths.” From Jennifer Robertson’s prose poem about Jesus and Jaipur, Rohan Chhetri’s universe in braille, or Shelly Bhoil’s typographical experimentation, this anthology shows us the pulse of a generation coming of age in an era of mass media and Hindu mythology. I have no doubt that this will be one of those books that when looked back on will have been proven to be seminal and indispensable, introducing us to both the present and the future of Indian poetry.” -Ravi Shankar, Pushcart Prize winning poet and Founding Editor of Drunken Boat * THIS ANTHOLOGY HAS BEEN EDITED BY NABINA DAS & SEMEEN ALI

    $5
  • The Memory of Silence

    About the Book

    Ashraf Aboul-Yazid breaks his silence, but in soft whispers. Like the soft susurration of the title of his first book of poems Washwashat Al Bahr (the Whisper of the Sea), his voice speaks to our soul directly, needing no aural recourse. His memories are a map rolled open, containing multitudes- cites and rivers, balconies and butterflies, evenings and sadness. We enter this atlas that is Aboul-Yazid’s selection of poems from his larger oeuvre and are introduced to one of Egypt’s most prolific poets, novelists, translators and literary critics. His poems evoke wehmut, a melancholy located in the acceptance of our transitory-ness in this world, which we inhabit but for two days- ‘A day to open his arms for friends/ And a day for hugging their mirage.’ In the Middle East of the present, beset with strife and displacement, his words are the many cuts on our complacency, rousing us from the safe acts of reading poetry in a book, bringing us face to face with protagonists of a history not of their own making. Those who are cursed to ‘know a homeland’ that is like a visa’. Those, beset with the weight of the past, stand exposed. ‘In the heavy rain; No one feels’ A lonely drop. Aboul-Yazid’s soft voice recounts memories from decades of remembering, mingling beauty and sadness, rising out from the depths of the Nile, into the balconies and mashrabiyas of Benha his hometown, and beyond into a poet?s state of permanent exile. – Mustansir Dalvi poet, translator and cultural theorist

    $16
  • Light, the Temptation

    About the Book

    In Zingonia’s new poems it is a similar exercise that is happening. Instead of justifying the ways of God to men, these poems seem to me to be the ways of men and women to God. This daring act of a moment of surrender to the pristine unity of every thing cements the diverse poems here into one epic of mutations and metamorphoses. In this world the persona an Algerian beggar can merge into one of Jesus. Atoms and stars partake of the same reality as a flower. The fractured fates of Shen Fu, Maurice Utrillo and Max Jacob, which are acts of recurrent human tragedy become settings of Divine Comedy. Though the thrust of Zingonia’s poems is indubitably mystical, their mysticism goes beyond orthodoxies and heterodoxies of what is generally considered mystical. Their laconic beauty has the palpability of something militantly this- worldly as if Eternity is indissolubly in love with creations of time. At this point my words want to go back to the eloquent silence of these poems. I am sure other readers of this remarkable work will find these poems as enchanting and enlightening as I did. ‘Light, the Temptation’ is not a work to be read and abandoned. It invites us to contemplate on the rich resonances of its deceptively simple expressions in order to return the world to the world, ourselves to ourselves, meanings to our world where faceless robots are marching blindly towards irredeemable emptiness. – H S Shivaprakash (an excerpt from his introductory note)

    $10
  • The Missing Rib (HB)

    About the Book

    This is a dark, powerful, pulsating collection of poems, the effect of which continues to reverberate, disturb and shock one out of one?s complacency long after one has finished reading them.. The Hindu (reviewing So Many Births) Satchidanandan’s poetry is an irresistible mix of the real, surreal, intellectual, sensual, and spiritual. Satchidanandan does not shy away from asking deeper existential questions -of being, freedom, love, compassion, nature, language, death Shanta Acharya (reviewing While I Write in Modern Poetry in Translation) Satchidanandan’s ‘I’ tells stories about itself, and like all good story-tellers, by telling its own story, his ‘I’ ends up telling stories about others as well. There is an ethical bent in this aesthetic enterprise, where fondness and empathy towards others enter your lines and transform your poetry the way they once transformed your life. Manash Bhattacharya (reviewing While I Write in Biblio) K. Satchidanandan is definitely not a poet who keeps aloof from the world. He is a poet on a journey.. Poetry for him is a cry against all walls? It is his cosmopolitanism that makes Satchidanandan interesting beyond India. Dr. Wolfgang Kubin (Reviewing the German collection, Ich Globe Nicht an Grenzen in Orientierungen: Zeitschrift zur Kultur)

    $12
  • The Missing Rib (PB)

    About the Book

    This is a dark, powerful, pulsating collection of poems, the effect of which continues to reverberate, disturb and shock one out of one?s complacency long after one has finished reading them.. The Hindu (reviewing So Many Births) Satchidanandan’s poetry is an irresistible mix of the real, surreal, intellectual, sensual, and spiritual. Satchidanandan does not shy away from asking deeper existential questions -of being, freedom, love, compassion, nature, language, death Shanta Acharya (reviewing While I Write in Modern Poetry in Translation) Satchidanandan’s ‘I’ tells stories about itself, and like all good story-tellers, by telling its own story, his ‘I’ ends up telling stories about others as well. There is an ethical bent in this aesthetic enterprise, where fondness and empathy towards others enter your lines and transform your poetry the way they once transformed your life. Manash Bhattacharya (reviewing While I Write in Biblio) K. Satchidanandan is definitely not a poet who keeps aloof from the world. He is a poet on a journey.. Poetry for him is a cry against all walls? It is his cosmopolitanism that makes Satchidanandan interesting beyond India. Dr. Wolfgang Kubin (Reviewing the German collection, Ich Globe Nicht an Grenzen in Orientierungen: Zeitschrift zur Kultur)

    $12
  • The Owl and the Laughing Buddha

    About the Book

    The poems in The Owl and the Laughing Buddha bring a ‘lighthouse sweep of attentiveness’ to their subjects. This is a book about noting, from the title poem’s companionable but contrasting figures on a writing desk to the devastating aftermath of a cloudburst in the mountains, and from a flier’s eye-view to a walker’s – and a mole’s. Here are poems interested in gods and figures of myth, and in observing houses, trees, birds and other creatures in a changing neighbourhood; poems that talk shop with fellow poets and respond to works of art and culture; and poems that watch our responses to the daily catastrophes that sometimes constitute ‘news’ – whose interest is no less a matter of whimsy, perhaps, than some of the tales narrated in the final section of the book. Yet the poems rest on an implicit conviction that everything must be given its due and treated seriously – though not solemnly, for it is mirth, after all, that is the laughing Buddha’s centre of gravity. Treading margins between the real and the imagined, the concerned and the tongue-in-cheek, this is Menon’s third collection of poems.

    $12
  • Four Degrees of Separation

    About the Book

    Potkar speaks with the cutting clarity of a woman wholly engaged with the world. She writes from the gilded moment vulnerability becomes knowledge, and then when knowledge becomes wisdom. The result, in all cases, is the poem: clever and crafted to a kind of broken perfection’ the cracks show, but the shattered places are dusted with powdered gold. ‘If a day is a life, a word is a story,’ Potkar writes. Her poetry condenses life into a gilded day, a story into a single word, as only a masterful poet can do it, or a woman can feel it. Mookie Katigbak-Lacuesta

    $16
  • Ajunahi Barach Kahi Baaki

    About the Book

    This is Dinkar Manvar’s second collection of poetry. A very powerful voice in Marathi; the poems in this collection are hard-hitting and honest showcasing life at its honest best.

    $16
  • Bookmarking the Oasis

    About the Book

    The poems in Bookmarking the Oasis slide between water and land as they reflect on boundaries, partings, and the identities thrust on us. Luminous, quiet, courageous, Srilata’s poems plunge into the poetics of the everyday, recording fugitive moments with humour, irony and compassion. Nothing escapes the poet?s eye, whether the classroom’s tyranny for both teacher and taught, the blindness of experts, the vulnerabilities of childhood, or the volatile interiors of the human mind. Some poems draw on other poets’ voices, beginning conversations and uncovering strange resonances. Connecting it all is the image of the oasis, unexpected, delicious; a serene, fluid clearing in the mind, bookmarked for later, that allows poetry – and everything else – to happen

    $15
  • Broomrider’s book of the dead

    About the Book

    Mukta Sambrani’s The woman in this room isn’t lonely is a book of surprising intensity and imagination. Sambrani has a lyricism and fanciful imagination seldom seen in English-language poetry in recent decades. A poem about a man and woman in bed is anything but sentimental. Sambrani’s economy, independence of mind, hard-headedness and irony combine into a rapidly dramatic scene, which within twelve lines becomes grotesquely comic…By now there is a tradition in Indian poems of the coming of poetry as something mysterious. Sambrani’s version is totally unexpected. Bruce King, Modern Indian Poetry in English. Mukta Sambrani’s poems in Broomrider’s book of the dead are notable for their extreme strangeness. The book-length sequence is presented as the working manuscript of its fictional protagonist, Anna Albuquar, whose project is to ‘renegotiate the idea of authorship.’ There are asides, hesitations, false starts, instructions to the reader, and throughout, a steadfast regard for language. Jeet Thayil in Fulcrum and Bloodaxe book of contemporary Indian poets Broomrider’s Book of the Dead…is experimental in every sense… a crowded collage and an eloquent concoction that will make you look up all the references it states or implies…Sambrani said that her protagonist was obsessed with capturing memory “beyond constraints of time and place, beyond decay, illness and the failing of the body. She is obsessed with writing about writing. I am curious about the architecture of our experience. As we move toward a world that is hyper-digitised, our psyches become more and more of an orchestration of fragments of media, sights, sounds, words and visuals. Anna’s writing leans back to lean forward. It captures the history of writing through writing in a world that constructs itself out of fragments of media.Lora Tomas in The Sunday Guardian

    $26
  • Hieroglyphs

    About the Book

    Hieroglyphs is a translation of Sahitya Akademi Award winning collection in Marathi- Chitralipi by Vasant Abaji Dahake. It has been translated into the English by Rahee Dahake.

    $29
  • First Infinities

    About the Book

    Hell, or a state very much like it, does feature in Nambisan’s poetic underworld, which is deep, intricate and enticing. …… – From the Preface by Adil Jussawala Nambisan’s view of humankind is bleak, his view of the possibilities of poetry even bleak

    $12
  • Andhantarala Lataklelya Avtarnat

    About the Book

    This is Ignatius Dias’s first book of poems published by PoetryPrimero.

    $10
  • Fuse

    About the Book

    “Perhaps most abundant of all in a book of such magnitude are poems that invoke the people, places and things that have forged the poet’s sensibility and sculpted her faith in the beauty and power of language;poems expressed at times with brilliant?

    $16